Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 29

Bu-Pc.29.1.1 BD.2.295 … at Rājagaha in the Bamboo Grove at the squirrels’ feeding-place. Now at that time the nun Thullanandā[1] came to frequent a certain family as a regular diner. And monks who were elders came to be invited by that householder. Then the nun Thullanandā, dressing in the morning, taking her bowl and robe, approached that family, and having approached, she said to that householder:

“Householder, why is this abundant solid food and soft food prepared?”

“Lady, elders are invited by me.”

“But who are the elders for you, householder?”

“Master Sāriputta,[2] master Moggallāna the Great,[3] master Kaccāna the Great,[4] master Koṭṭhita the Great,[5] master Kappina the Great,[6] master Cunda the Great,[7] master Anuruddha,[8] master Revata,[9] master Upāli,[10] master Ānanda,[11] master Rāhula.[12]

BD.2.296 “But why did you, householder, invite fellows[13] posing as[14] great heroes[15]?”

“But who are the great heroes for you, sister?”

“Master Devadatta, master Kokālika, master Kaṭamorakatissaka, master the son of the lady Khaṇḍā, master Samuddadatta.”[16]

Now this chance talk[17] of the nun Thullanandā was interrupted[18] when these monks who were elders entered. She said:

“Householder, is it true that the great heroes are invited by you?”[19]

“You, lady, called (them) now ‘fellows,’ now ‘great heroes,’” he said, and he turned her out of the house and put an end to regular dining. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can Devadatta eat alms-food knowing that it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun?”[20]

“Is it true, as is said, that you, Devadatta, ate alms-food knowing that it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked him, saying:

“How can you, foolish man, eat alms-food knowing that it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun? It is not, foolish man, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth: Vin.4.67

“Whatever monk should eat alms-food knowing that BD.2.297 it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun, there is an offence of expiation.”

And thus this rule of training for monks came to be laid down by the lord.


Bu-Pc.29.2.1 Now at that time a certain monk who had gone forth from Kajagaha arrived at a family of (his) relations. People, saying: “At last the revered sir[21] is come,” duly made ready a meal. A nun who frequented that family spoke thus to these people:

“Sirs, give a meal to the master.”

Then that monk, thinking: “It is forbidden by the lord to eat alms-food knowing that it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun,” being scrupulous, did not accept it; he was not able to walk for alms, he became famished.[22] Then that monk, having gone to the monastery, told this matter to the monks. The monks told this matter to the lord. Then the lord on this occasion, in this connection, having given reasoned talk, addressed the monks, saying:

“I allow you, monks, to eat alms-food knowing that it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun, if there is a prior arrangement with the householder.[23] And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should eat alms-food knowing that it was procured through (the intervention of) a nun, unless there is a prior arrangement with the householder, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.29.3.1 Whatever means: … is monk to be understood in this case.

He knows means: either he knows by himself, or others tell him, or she herself tells him.[24]

BD.2.298 A nun means: one ordained by both Orders.

Procures means: previously not desirous of giving, not desirous of treating him, if she says: “The master is a repeater, the master is very learned, the master is versed in the Suttantas, the master is an expert in Vinaya, the master is a speaker of dhamma, give to the master, treat the master”: this means procures.

Alms-food means: any one meal of the five (kinds of) meals.[25]

Unless there is a prior arrangement with the house-holder means: setting aside the arrangement with the householder.

An arrangement with the householder means: they are relations or they are invited[26] or they are ordinarily prepared (for the monk).[27]

If he says: “I will eat,” and accepts (a meal), unless there is a prior arrangement with the householder, there is an offence of wrong-doing. For each mouthful there is an offence of expiation. Vin.4.68


Bu-Pc.29.3.2 If he thinks that it is procured when it is procured (and) eats it, unless there is a prior arrangement with the householder, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt[28] as to whether it is procured (and) eats … with the householder, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not procured[29] when it is procured (and) eats … with the householder, there is no offence. If he eats what is procured through (the intervention of) one ordained by one (Order only), unless there is a prior arrangement with the house-holder, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is procured when it is not procured, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether BD.2.299 it is not procured, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not procured when it is not procured, there is no offence.


Bu-Pc.29.3.3 There is no offence if there is a prior arrangement with the householder; if a female probationer procures it, if a female novice procures it; setting aside the five (kinds of) meals, there is no offence in (eating) any others[30]; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Ninth

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. BD.1.110; Vin.4.211, Vin.4.332ff.; SN.ii.219, SN.ii.222.

2.

Chief of the disciples of great wisdom, AN.i.23. See Thag.340. For reference to all these, see Psalms of the Bretheren; GS.1.16GS.1.20; and Dictionary of Pali Proper Names

3.

Chief of the disciples of psychic potencies, AN.i.23. See Thag.382.

4.

Chief of the disciples who are expounders in full of brief sayings, AN.i.23. See Thag.238.

5.

Chief of the disciples who are masters of logical analysis, AN.i.24. See Thag.6.

6.

Chief of the disciples who are exhorters of monks, AN.i.25. See Thag.254.

7.

Not specially distinguished in AN.i. See Thag.118.

8.

Chief of the disciples who are of deva-sight, AN.i.23. See Thag.325.

9.

Revata Khadiravaniya, “the acacia woodlander”; at AN.i.24 is called “chief of the jungle-dwellers,” while Kaṅkhā-revata is there called chief of musers. Vin-a. does not say which one is meant. See Thag.45, Thag.279, Thag.7.

10.

Chief of those versed in Vinaya, AN.i.25. See Thag.168. Also BD.1, Index.

11.

Chief of those of wide learning, of those who are mindful, of those of good behaviour, of those who are resolute, of personal attendants, AN.i.24f. See Thag.349.

12.

Chief of those desirous of training, AN.i.24. See Thag.183, Gotama’s only son.

13.

cetaka. Under ceṭaka, Pali-English Dictionary, referring to this passage, gives “servant, slave, (bad) fellow,” while for cetaka it gives “decoy-bird.” Commentary of no help.

14.

tiṭṭhamāna.

15.

Mahānāga, nāga also meaning snake or elephant.

16.

The schismatics of Bu-Ss.10, Bu-Ss.11, see BD.1.

17.

antarākathā. Cf. Ud.11.

18.

vippakatā, interrupted, broken off, left unfinished, but Vin-a.808 reads vippakathā ’ti kayiramānā hoti (variant reading honti).

19.

Vin-a.808, “looking round as the elders came in, she spoke thus, knowing that they had heard her.”

20.

bhikkhunīparipācita; Vin-a.809, “procuring it, making it be taken by explaining its qualities.”

21.

bhaddanto.

22.

chinnabhatta.

23.

pubbe gihisamārambhe, a prior undertaking on the part of the householder. Vin-a.809 says samārambha is a synonym for paṭiyādita, given, arranged, prepared.

24.

Cf. above, BD.2.161, BD.2.261; below, BD.2.333.

25.

Cf. below, BD.2.305. These five kinds of meals are enumerated below, BD.2.330.

26.

pavārita.

27.

pakaṭipatiyatta. Vin-a.809, they (i.e., meals) are usually prepared (paṭiyādita) for that very monk, with the words, ‘we will give to the elder.’

28.

Oldenberg at Vin.4.359 says that in these two cases the manuscript called “C.” has āpatti pācittiyassa, an offence of expiation.

29.

Oldenberg at Vin.4.359 says that in these two cases the manuscript called C. has āpatti pācittiyassa, an offence of expiation.

30.

I.e., in eating rice-gruel, cakes, and fruits prepared for a nun, Vin-a.809. Cf. below, BD.2.305, BD.2.314, BD.2.320.