Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 20

Bu-Pc.20.1.1 BD.2.261 … at Āḷavī in the chief shrine at Āḷavī. Now at that time the monks of Āḷavī, doing repairs, knowing that the water contained life, sprinkled grass and clay and had them sprinkled. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the monks of Āḷavī, knowing that the water contained life … and have them sprinkled?” Then these monks told this matter to the lord…

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, knowing that the water contained life … and had them sprinkled?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, knowing that the water contained life … and have them sprinkled? Vin.4.49 It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk, knowing that the water contains life, should sprinkle grass or clay or should have them sprinkled, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.20.2.1 Whatever means: … is monk to be understood in this case.

He knows[1] means: either he knows by himself or others tell him.

Should sprinkle means: if he himself sprinkles, there is an offence of expiation.

Should have sprinkled means: if he commands another, there is an offence of expiation. When once commanded, if he sprinkles many times, there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.20.2.2 BD.2.262 If he thinks that it contains life when it contains life, (and) sprinkles grass or clay or has them sprinkled, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether it contains life … has them sprinkled, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it does not contain life when it contains life … has them sprinkled, there is no offence.[2] If he thinks that it contains life when it does not contain life, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether it does not contain life, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it does not contain life when it does not contain life, there is no offence.


Bu-Pc.20.2.3 There is no offence if it was unintentional, if he was not thinking, if he did not know[3]; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Tenth

This is its key:

Vegetable-growth, by another,
making (someone) look down upon,
these two on setting forth,
First, throwing out, removable (feet),
and on doors, containing life.

The Second Division: that on Vegetable-growth

Footnotes and references:

2.

Oldenberg says, Vin.4.358, that in his manuscript called “C.” this case is left out.

3.

Cf. above, BD.2.225, BD.2.229, and Vin.4.125.