Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 16

Bu-Pc.16.1.1 BD.2.247 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks took possession of the best sleeping-places.[1] The monks who were elders turned them away. Then it occurred to the group of six monks:

“What now if we, by some stratagem, should spend the rainy season[2] in this very place?” Then the group of six monks, encroaching upon[3] (the space intended for) monks who were elders, lay down in the sleeping-places, saying:

“He for whom it becomes too crowded may depart.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the group of six monks lie down in sleeping-places, encroaching upon (the space intended for) monks who are elders?” Then these monks told this matter to the lord. Vin.4.43

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, lay down in sleeping-places … for monks who are elders?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, lie down in sleeping-places, encroaching upon (the space intended for) monks, who are elders? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing BD.2.248 those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should lie down in a sleeping-place in a dwelling belonging to the Order, knowing that he is encroaching upon (the space intended for) a monk arrived first, saying, ‘He for whom it becomes too crowded may depart,’ doing it for just this object, not for another,[4] there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.16.2.1 Whatever means:

A dwelling belonging to the Order means: it comes to be given to the Order, handed over to it.[5]

He knows[6] means: he knows, thinking, ‘He is an old man’[7]; he knows, thinking, ‘He is an ill man’; he knows, thinking, ‘It was given to the Order.’

Encroaching upon means: forcing a way into.[8]

Should lie down in a sleeping-place means: if entering or departing he spreads a sleeping-place or has one spread in the precincts of a couch or a chair, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he sits down on it or lies down on it, there is an offence of expiation.

Doing it for just this object, not for another means: there comes to be no other object whatever for which to lie down, encroaching, in a sleeping-place.


Bu-Pc.16.2.2 If he thinks that it belongs to the Order when it belongs to the Order, (and) encroaching, lies down, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether it belongs to the Order, (and) encroaching, lies down, there is an offence of expiation. If he thinks that it belongs to an individual when it belongs to the Order, (and) encroaching, lies down, there is an offence of expiation. If entering or departing, setting aside the precincts of a couch or chair, he spreads a sleeping - BD.2.249 place or causes one to be spread, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he sits down on it or lies down on it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he spreads a sleeping-place or causes one to be spread in the precincts of a dwelling-place or in an assembly-room or in a hut or at the foot of a tree or in the open air,[9] there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he sits down on it or lies down on it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it belongs to the Order when it belongs to an individual, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether it belongs to an individual, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it belongs to an individual when it belongs to an individual (but) to another individual, there is an offence of wrong-doing; if it belongs to the individual himself, there is no offence.[10]


Bu-Pc.16.2.3 There is no offence if an ill man enters, if one pressed by cold or by heat enters, if there are accidents; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Sixth Vin.4.44

Footnotes and references:

1.

varaseyyāyo palibuddhanti = Vin.2.166. For palibuddha, cf. above, BD.2.242, BD.2.245f.

2.

Cf above, BD.2.208.

3.

anupakhajja = anpavisitva according to Old Commentary, and Vin-a.780. Word occurs again in Bu-Pc.43 and at Vin.2.213. Editor, Vinaya Texts iii.285, n.3, says that sense intended in these three passages is the same, while it is different at Vin.2.88, there explained by Buddhaghosa as antopavisati. At Vin.1.47 the monk who shares the cell of his preceptor is not to sit down so as to encroach upon the elders (na there bhikkhū anupakhajja nisīditabbaṃ).

4.

Cf. below, BD.2.352, and Vin.4.149, Vin.4.150.

5.

Cf. Vin.3.266, and above, BD.2.244.

6.

Cf. above, BD.2.161.

7.

vuḍḍho; therefore he should not be made to get up, Vin-a.780.

8.

anupavisitvā, or entering into = Vin.4.95. Cf. Vin-a.780.

9.

Cf. above, BD.2.241.

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