Vinaya (3): The Cullavagga

by T. W. Rhys Davids | 1881 | 137,074 words

The Cullavagga (part of the Vinaya collection) includes accounts of the First and Second Buddhist Councils as well as the establishment of the community of Buddhist nuns. The Cullavagga also elaborates on the etiquette and duties of Bhikkhus....

Cullavagga, Khandaka 6, Chapter 20

1. Now at that time the Bhikkhus walked over the mats used for sleeping upon with unwashen or wet feet, or with their sandals on; and the matting was soiled.

They told these matters to the Blessed One.

'You are not, O Bhikkhus, to do so. Whosoever does, shall be guilty of a dukkaṭa[1].'

2. Now at that time the Bhikkhus spat on the newly prepared floor[2], and the colour was spoilt. They told this matter to the Blessed One.

'You are not, O Bhikkhus, to do so. Whosoever does, shall be guilty of a dukkaṭa. I allow, O Bhikkhus, the use of a spittoon.'

Now at that time the legs of the bedsteads and chairs made scratches on the newly prepared floor. They told this matter to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to cover it up with floor-cloth.'

Now at that time the Bhikkhus leant up against the newly prepared walls[3], and the colouring was spoilt.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'You are not, O Bhikkhus, to do so. Whosoever does, shall be guilty of a dukkaṭa. I allow you, O Bhikkhus, the use of a board to lean up against[4].'

The board scratched the floor at the bottom, and ruined the wall at the top.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to cover it at the top and bottom with cloth.'

Now at that time, fearing to offend, they would not lie down on places over which it was permissible to walk with washen feet[5]. They told this matter to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to lie down in such a place when you have spread something over it.'

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

With this should be compared the other rule in Mahāvagga V, 6, 1, according to which the Bhikkhus were to wear sandals when getting upon bedsteads or chairs, lest these should become soiled. The two passages are parallel in wording throughout.

[2]:

Parikammakatāya. The floors were of earth, not of wood, and were restored from time to time by fresh clay or dry cowdung being laid down, and then covered with a whitewash, in which sometimes black or red (geruka) was mixed. See above, V, 11, 6; VI, 3, 1; 17, 1; 27. From the parallel passage at Mahāvagga I, 25, 15, and Cullavagga VIII, 3, 1, it would seem that the red colouring was used rather for walls, and the black one for floors.

[3]:

'The walls were no doubt usually made with 'wattle and daub;' that is, sticks with clay between the interstices. This was treated from time to time like the flooring (see last note).

[4]:

Apassena-phalakaṃ. This article of furniture is mentioned, with the spittoon, in Mahāvagga I, 45, 15, 16, and in the parallel passage at Cullavagga VIII, 1, 3. We have rendered it in the Mahāvagga by 'board to recline on.' Compare the use of apassayaṃ in Buddhaghosa's note on Cullavagga VI, 2, 4 (above, p. 153, note 3) of an arm-chair or sofa.

[5]:

Dhotapādakā ti dhotapādakā hutvā dhotehi pādehi akkamitabbaṭḥāne nipajjituṃ kukkuccāyanti. Dhotapādake ti pi pāṭho. Dhotehi pādehi akkamitabbaṭṭhānass’ eva etaṃ adhivacanaṃ (B.).

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