Vinaya (2): The Mahavagga

by T. W. Rhys Davids | 1881 | 156,382 words

The Mahavagga (part of the Vinaya collection) includes accounts of Gautama Buddha’s and the ten principal disciples’ awakenings, as well as rules for ordination, rules for reciting the Patimokkha during uposatha days, and various monastic procedures....

Mahavagga, Khandaka 7, Chapter 8

1. 'A Bhikkhu, after the Kaṭhina ceremony has been held, goes away with the expectation of getting a robe (presented). And when he has got beyond the boundary, &c. And he adopts such a course of action as may lead to his expectation being realised. But he obtains a robe where he had not expected it, and does not obtain it where he had expected it. And he thinks, "I will have the robe made up here, and will never go back." And he gets the robe made up.

'That Bhikkhu's Kaṭhina privileges are suspended on the ground of his having a robe ready for wear.

'A Bhikkhu, after the Kaṭhina ceremony has been held (&c., as in the preceding case). And he thinks, "I will neither have the robe made up, nor will I go back."

'That Bhikkhu's Kaṭhina privileges are suspended on the ground of his having so decided.

'A Bhikkhu, after the Kaṭhina ceremony has been held, &c. And he thinks, "I will have the robe made up here, and will never go back." And he has the robe made up. And as the robe is being made up for him, it is spoilt.

'That Bhikkhu's Kaṭhina privileges are suspended on the ground of the robe being so spoilt.

'A Bhikkhu, after the Kaṭhina ceremony has been held, goes away with the expectation of getting a robe (presented). And when he has got beyond the boundary, he thinks, "I will adopt here such a course of action as may lead to my expectation being realised, and will never go back." And he devotes himself to obtaining that expected gift, but his expectation comes to nothing.

'That Bhikkhu's Kaṭhina privileges are suspended on the ground of the lapse of that expectation.'

2, 3[1].

__________________

End of the section entitled Anāsā-doḷasaka[2].

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

§§ 2, 3 stand exactly in the same relation to § 1 in which chap. 6. 2, 3 stand to chap. 6. 1.

[2]:

'The twelve cases (in which the robe is received) against expectation.'

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