Verses on the Perfection of Wisdom

Prajñāpāramitā Ratnaguṇasaṃcayagāthā

14,137 words

Prajnaparamita Ratnagunasamcayagatha Translated by Edward Conze (Taisho Tripitaka 0229)...

Chapter XXIV

How Mara is Discomforted and Defeated

But Mara at that time becomes like one who feels a thorn in his flesh,
Afflicted with sorrow, miserable, displeased, of little stamina.
[He manifests] a conflagration on the horizon, he hurls a meteor, in order to cause fear,
'How can this Bodhisattva be made to become despondent in his mind!'

When the wise become resolutely intent,
Day and night beholding the meaning of wisdom, the foremost perfection,
Then their bodies, thoughts and speech become [free] like a bird in the sky.
How can the Kinsman of Darkness gain entrance to them?


What Makes Mara Contented

When a Bodhisattva has taken to quarrels and disputes,
And when the thoughts [of two Bodhisattvas] become mutually conflicting and angry,
Then Mara becomes contented, and supremely elated, [thinking:]
'Both these remain far distant from the cognition of the Jinas.

Both these remain far distant [from it], comparable to malignant demons;
Both these will effect for themselves a waning of their pledge.
Those who are full of hate, deficient in patience, how can they have enlightenment?' -
Then Mara becomes contented, together with his host.


The Bodhisattva's Pride and Repentance

If a Bodhisattva who has not had his prediction
Should have angry thoughts for one who has had it, and should bring about a dispute:
For as many moments as he persists in his obstinate faulty thoughts,
For so many aeons he must again put on the armour.

Then he sets up mindfulness, and [he reflects], 'These are unwholesome thoughts;
By means of the perfection of patience do the Buddhas experience enlightenment.'
He confesses his fault, and afterwards he restrains himself,
Or he desists, and trains himself in this Buddha-dharma.