Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

by Gelongma Karma Migme Chödrön | 2001 | 940,961 words

This page describes “the knowledge of all the aspects is practiced after omniscience” as written by Nagarjuna in his Maha-prajnaparamita-sastra (lit. “the treatise on the great virtue of wisdom”) in the 2nd century. This book, written in five volumes, represents an encyclopedia on Buddhism as well as a commentary on the Pancavimsatisahasrika Prajnaparamita.

VI. The knowledge of all the aspects is practiced after omniscience

Question. – But as soon as he acquires complete enlightenment (saṃbodhi), the Buddha completely fulfills both omniscience (sarvajñatā) and the knowledge of all the aspects (sarvākārajñatā) by means of his knowledge of the paths (mārgajñatā). Why does [the sūtra] say here that he uses omniscience to perfect the knowledge of all the aspects?

Answer. – It is true that, as soon as he attains enlightenment, the Buddha completely fulfills omniscience and completely fulfills the knowledge of all the aspects by means of his knowledge of the paths. He could be compared to the king of a great country: at the time when he ascends his throne, he enters into possession of his territories (viṣaya) and his treasuries (kośa), but he has not yet opened them and used them.