Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

by Gelongma Karma Migme Chödrön | 2001 | 940,961 words

This page describes “the concept of dissatisfaction toward the entire world” as written by Nagarjuna in his Maha-prajnaparamita-sastra (lit. “the treatise on the great virtue of wisdom”) in the 2nd century. This book, written in five volumes, represents an encyclopedia on Buddhism as well as a commentary on the Pancavimsatisahasrika Prajnaparamita.

VII. The concept of dissatisfaction toward the entire world

Notion of dissatisfaction toward the entire world (sarvaloke ’nabhirati). – If one thinks about the world, its sense pleasures (kāmaguṇa), sweet tastes (rasa), chariots, fine garments, warm rooms, gardens, houses and all kinds of pleasant things, one has a notion of contentment (abhiratisaṃjñā). If one thinks of the misfortunes and misdeeds of the world, the mind has a notion of dislike (udvegasaṃjñā). What are the ills of the world?

The ills of the world are of two types:

[1) beings (sattva)]

[2) lands (pradeśa)]