Guhyagarbha Tantra (with Commentary)

by Gyurme Dorje | 1987 | 304,894 words

The English translation of the Guhyagarbha Tantra, including Longchenpa's commentary from the 14th century. The whole work is presented as a critical investigation into the Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism, of which the Guhyagarbhatantra is it's principle text. It contains twenty-two chapters teaching the essence and practice of Mahayoga, which s...

Text 16.3 (Commentary)

[Guhyagarbha-Tantra, Text section 16.3]

OṂ VAJRA GAURĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA CAURĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA PRAMOHĀ HA
OṂ VAJRA VETĀLĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA CAṆḌĀLĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA PUKKĀSĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA GHASMARĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA ŚMAŚĀNĪ HA
OṂ VAJRA SIṂHAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA VYĀGHRAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA ŚṚGĀLAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA ŚVĀNAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA GṚDHRAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA KAṄKAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA KĀKAMUKHĪ HE
OṂ VAJRA ULŪKAMUKHĪ HE [3]

Commentary:

[The second section comprises the mantras of the eight Mātarīs. (It comments on Ch. 16.3):]

These are preceded by the syllables OṂ VAJRA, the meanings of which have been explained above. Gaurī means "she who is white”. In most texts of the past the word gaurī is interpreted as such. However it has many other meanings such as "repository", "learned", and "delighting in lotus flowers", so that it may also 9 be translated as "repository” (mdzod-ldan).

Caurī means "she who is a thief”. Pramohā means "she who is deluded". Vetālī means "she who is a zombie". Caṇḍālī means "she who is fierce". Pukkāsī means "she who is is fragrant". Ghasmarī means "eater of unclean flesh". Śmaśānī means "she who frequents charnel grounds".

The eight syllables HA are their seed-syllables. When the syllables: OṂ VAJRA GAURĪ JAḤ are added, the enlightened activities (of the Mātarīs) are performed; and when the syllable JAḤ is visualised, they are pleased. (Their mantras) should be known as such.

[The third section comprises the mantras of the eight Piśācīs. (It comments on Ch. 16.3):]

SIṂHAMUKHĪ means "she who is lion-faced"; VYĀGHRAMUKHĪ means "she who is tiger-faced"; ŚṚGALAMUKHĪ means "she who is fox-faced".

ŚVĀNAMUKHĪ means "she who is dog-faced". GṚDHRAMUKHĪ means "she who is vulture-faced". KAṄKAMUKHĪ means "she who is kite-faced". KĀKAMUKHĪ means "she who is crow-faced"; and ULŪKAMUKHĪ means "she who is owl-faced". The eight syllables HŪṂ are their seed-syllables. Their mantras of enlightened activity are also compounded in the previous manner (i.e. with JAḤ).

[The fourth section comprises the mantras of the four female gatekeepers. (It comments on Ch. 16.4):]

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