close
Wisdom Library Logo

Dhammasangani

Enumeration of Phenomena

Chapter XIV - The Supplementary Set Of Pairs

Pitthidukam

[Page 331] [1254] Which are the states that are to be put away by insight?

The Three Fetters, to wit: theory of individuahty, perplexity and the contagion of mere rule and ritual.

[1255-1257]

Identical with §§ 1003-1006.

[1258] Which are the states that are not to be put away by insight?

All states whatever, good, bad and indeterminate, except the three afore-mentioned, whether they relate to the worlds of sense, form or the formless, or to the life that is Unincluded; in other words, the four skandhas; all form also and uncompounded element.

[1259, 1260] Which are the states that are

(a) to he put aivay hy cultivation?

All the remaining lust, hate and dulness as well as the Corruptions united with them, the four skandhas associated with them, and the action, bodily, vocal and mental, springing from them.

(b) not to he put away hy cultivation?

Answer as for those states which are not to he put away hy insight [§ 1258].

[1261] Which are the states the causes of which are to be put away by insight?

The Three Fetters, to wit: theory of individuality, perplexity and the contagion of mere rule and ritual.

[Page 332] [1262-1264]

Identical with §§ 1003-1006.

[1265] Which are the states the causes of which are not to be put away by insight?

Answer as for those 'states which are not to be put away by insight', § 1258.

[1266, 1267] Which are the states the causes of which are

(a) to he put away by cultivation?

All the remaining lust, hate and dulness: these are the causes that are to be put away[1] by cultivation. And the Corruptions united with them, the four skandhas associated with them, and the action, bodily, vocal and mental, springing from them, are the states the causes of which are to be put away by cultivation.

(b) not to he put away hy cultivation?

Ansiver as for the ' states which are not to be put away by cultivation', § 1260.

[1268-1271] Which are the states

(a) 'wherein conception works'?

The four skandhas when associated with conception (the latter not being included), [which springs up] in a soil wherein conception works, either in the worlds of sense or form, or in the life that is Unincluded.[2]

(b) 'void of the working of conception'?

The four skandhas when springing up in a soil void of conception, either in the worlds of sense, form or the formless, or in the life that is Unincluded; conception itself also, and all form and uncompounded element.

[Page 333] (c) 'wherein works thought discursive'?
(d) 'void of the working of thought discursive'?

Answers (substituting 'discursive thought' for 'conception') as in §§ 1268, 1269 respectively.

[1272-1277] Which are the states that are

arrow left  (a) joyous?[3]
  (b) not joyous?

arrow left  (c) accompanied by joy?
  (d) unaccompanied by joy?

arrow left  (e) accompanied by ease?
  (f) unaccompanied by ease?

Answers to each pair of questions analogous to those in §§ 1268, 1269, 'joy' or 'ease' being substituted in due order for 'conception'.

[1278, 1279] Which are the states that are

(a) accompanied by disinterestedness?

The three skandhas of perception, syntheses and intellect,[4] when associated with disinterestedness (the latter not being included), [which springs up] in a soil congenial to it, either in the worlds of sense, form or the formless, or in the life that is Unincluded.

(b) unaccompanied by disinterestedness?

The four skandhas [when springing up] in a soil uncongenial to disinterestedness, either in the worlds of sense or form,[5] or in the life that is Unincluded; disinterestedness itself also, and all form and uncompounded element.

[Page 334] [1281-1287] Which are the states that

(a) relate (belong) to the universe of sense?[6]

Take from the waveless deep of woe beneath up to the heaven above of the Parinimittavasavatti gods inclusive — then whatever has there its range, and is therein included, whether it be skandha, element or sphere[7] — form, feeling, perception, syntheses, intellect: these are states that relate (belong) to the universe of sense.

(b) do not relate (belong) to the universe of sense?

The universe of form, that of the formless and the life that is Unincluded.

(c) relate (belong) to the universe of form?

Take from the Brahma-world below up to the heaven above of the Akanittha gods inclusive — then whatever states, both of sense and intellect, have therein their range and are therein included, whether they are states of one who has attained [Jhana having potential good], or of one in whom [resultant Jhana] has arisen, or of one living happily under present conditions.[8]

(d) do not relate (belong) to the universe of form?

The universe of sense, that of the formless and the life that is Unincluded.

(e) relate (belong) to the universe of the formless?

Take from the entrance among the gods of 'the sphere of infinite space'[9] as the lower limit, and up to the entrance [Page 335] above among the gods of 'the sphere where there is neither perception nor non-perception' — then whatever states, both of sense and intellect, have therein their range and are therein included, whether they are states of one who has attained [Jhana having potential good], or of one in whom [resultant Jhana] has arisen, or of one living happily under present conditions: these are states that relate (belong) to the universe of the formless.

(f) do not relate (belong) to the universe of the formless?

The universe of sense,[10] that of form, and the life that is Unincluded.

(g) belong to the Included?

Co-Intoxicant states, good, bad and indeterminate, whether they relate to the worlds of sense, of form or of the formless; in other words, the five skandhas.

(h) belong to the Unincluded?

The Paths, and the Fruits of the Paths, and uncompounded element.

[1288, 1289] Which are the states by which

(a) there is a going away?[11]

The four Paths that are the Unincluded.

(b) there is no going away?

All states, good, bad and indeterminate, except those four, whether they relate to the worlds of sense, form or [Page 336] the formless, or to the Hfe that is Unincluded; in other words, the four skandhas; all form also, and uncompounded element.

[1290, 1291] Which are the states that are

(a) fired in their consequences?[12]

The five acts that have immediate results, and those wrong views that are fixed in their consequences; the four Paths also that are the Unincluded.

(b) not fixed in their consequences?

Answer as in § 1289.

[1292, 1293] Which are the states that have

(a) something beyond?[13]

Co-Intoxicant states, good, bad and indeterminate, whether they relate to the worlds of sense, of form, or of the formless; in other words, the five skandhas.

(b) no 'beyond'?

The four Paths that are the Unincluded, and the Fruits of the Paths, and uncompounded element.

[1294, 1295] Which are the states that are

(a) concomitant with war?[14]

[Page 337] The three roots of bad (karma): lust, hate and dulness — and the Corruptions united with them; the four skandhas associated with them; the action, bodily, vocal and mental, springing from them.

(b) not concomitant with war?

Good, bad and indeterminate states, whether they relate to the worlds of sense, form or the formless, or to the life that is Unincluded; in other words, the four skandhas; all form also, and uncompounded element.

first previous index next last

- Footnotes:

1.

In the text, for pahatabba-hetuka (first occurrence) read pahatabba-hetu.

2.

Cf this and following pairs with §§ 996-998 and p. 252, n. 1. See also App. I., pp. 362, 363. In the text, arupavacare should be omitted, and apariyapanne substituted for pariyapanne.

3.

Sappitika. The term is used to qualify sukham, A. i. 81. How far, if at all, its connotation is distinguishable from that of piti-sahagata (§ 1274) I cannot say.

In the answers to the positive terms arupavacare should be omitted from the printed text. Cf, § 265 et seq.

4.

Upekkha (disinterestedness) is a mode of vedana or feeling, and is therefore not said to be associated with itself.

5.

In the printed text omit arupavacare.

6.

Kamavacara. The avacaras are discussed in my Introduction (vi).

7.

Khandha-dhatu-ayatana (cf K.). I take this to be an adjectival dvandva compound qualifying dhamma, but the five following terms, the skandhas, to be in apposition to dhamma.

8.

The three terms rendered by the last three periphrases are samapannassa, uppannassa and ditthadhammasukhaviharissa. The Cy. (p. 888) explains them as referring to kusala-jhanam, vipaka-jhanam and kiriya-jhanam. The subject is further dealt with in my Introduction (viii).

9.

See pp. 71-75.

10.

This is inadvertently omitted in the printed text.

11.

Niyyanika. In § 277 et seq. the word has been rendered 'whereby there is a going forth and onward', the Cy. leaving it somewhat vaguely defined, and the context, both in that connexion and this, showing that the expression imports rather the quest of the Ideal than its attainment. Here the Cy. is briefer and more emphatic (Asl. 50).

The word is said to signify,

'They, cutting off the root of re-birth and making Nirvana their object, go down from (niyy anti) that round of transmigration'.

The good states included under the opposite category will be those static stages of attainment in the upward progress termed the Fruits of the Paths.

12.

See §§ 1028-1030.

13.

Sa-uttara = capable of transcending, of rejecting self (or soul). Asl. 50. The term is applied to cittam in D. i. 80. In the an-uttara dhamma this transcending has been accomplished.

14.

Sarana,

'an equivalent for those passions, etc., overcome by which beings in divers ways incur weeping and misery'
. . . '= together with fightings' (saha ranehi).

Asl. 50.

'Dulness associated with lust is co-warring (sarano) with lust, or, associated with hate, is co-warring with hate'.

Asl. 388.

One is reminded of the Christian parallel of 'fleshly lusts which war against the soul' and of των ηδονων των στρατενομενων εν τοις μελεσιν υμων, although the concomitance in assault is in this case not emphasized.

In the Therigatha Subha turns the tables — 'wars a good warfare' — by fighting against the sensual desires hostile to her progress (vv. 358, 360).

first previous index next last